There was quite a lot of hype surrounding the release of Puzzle City. I’ve heard that it’s a “new” style of play, and I’ve heard that it’s very “original” and I’ve also heard that it’s a whole lot of fun. After spending some time with it, I’d say that depends on how you spell fun. F-r-u-s-t-r-a-t-i-n-g? S-t-r-e-s-s-f-u-l? Wow, don’t we have the game for you.

The core of Puzzle City is exactly the same as Puzzle Express. A conveyor belt carrying puzzle pieces move along the bottom of your screen, and your job is to take those pieces and fit them onto the car – I mean city block – above. If your conveyor belt fills up, it breaks down and you’ll have to start the level over. Puzzle City builds upon this basic gameplay by adding lots of power-ups and glitz, but the game remains basically the same.

There are three basic power-ups – the recycling bin, the trash, and the bulldozer. Dropping a piece into the recycling bin will turn it into another piece of the same color, doing the same with it with the trash throws the piece out. The bulldozer will destroy a block on the map, and if you have a 2×2 block, it’d take the entire thing out. There are also room for 10 conveyor power-ups, ranging from ones that slows down and stop the belt to ones that destroys everything on the belt. Especially useful are the ones that changes every block on your belt to a 1×1 block.

In order to unlock these power-ups, you need to create 2×2 blocks of solid color on your map. Each time you do so, a power-up will float nicely upwards and is added to your conveyor belt power-up collection. This is all well and good, but added to the predefined color areas, the game can get downright impossible.

Ah, predefined color areas. They’re lovely things. Basically, parts of the map are colored in faintly, and you have to match the colors. Now, I’m not against them – they add a great layer of challenge. However, they can make the game frustratingly difficult towards the end of world 2 when you need to use lots of 1×1’s, there isn’t any room to MAKE power-ups, you need to make 2 2×2’s of blue, and you’re desperate for power-ups that you haven’t any room to make. A better approach might be to make them optional – 80% of predefined areas filled. Even better – 10x score for filling these areas.

Some games are pretty, some games are flashy. Puzzle City falls squarely into the flashy category. Everything is high-contrast and colorful. I mean everything. The world map is colorful, the map is colorful. UFOs fly all over the place, buildings are shooting up left right and center, cranes are going up all over the city. As you make a 3 block areas into a 2×2 by adding a single block, the entire area is tore down to make room for a big building. Puzzle City is very much alive – something is happening all the time.

On top of it all, each scenario has its own objectives – you could be asked to build special buildings, fill a certain percentage of the map, etc. It serves to both make the game a little easier and keep you on your toes. If you miss so much as a 1×1 block on a predefined area you could be left wondering where you went wrong as your belt piles up, but in other scenarios you could finish up the map by filling a measly requirement.

Flashy isn’t necessarily a good thing; it’s pretty easy to miss a 1×1 block right behind a stack of buildings. Thankfully, Puzzle Express highlights the colors on the map that corresponds to the color of the block in your hand. This is a very helpful feature – I for one couldn’t tell if a building is residential by looking at it. It’s still pretty easy to miss spots, however, in predefined areas. Afterall, I’m looking for a light colored hole in a similarly colored area.

Let’s move on to the city building aspect of the game. There isn’t any.

Yes. You heard me – there isn’t any. Aside from the fact that you’re technically building a city, you are not, in fact, managing any part of it. There’s no budget to keep track of, transportation to arrange, police officers to dispatch, or anything related to a real city sim. “City building” is limited to a graphical “skin” of the game. It can easily be called “Puzzle Forest” if we replaced the buildings with trees, or “Puzzle Garden” replacing those same trees with vegetables or flowers. If you’re looking for Sim City, it’s not here. Puzzle City’s successful city-building is calculated based on whether you fill predefined areas and how big your combined buildings are – the bigger the better. So having one megalohospital at one corner of the city is much better than having single small ones sprinkled throughout.

Another “feature” of the game is “build special buildings.” This involved plunking down single 1×1 brown blocks from your belt to a predefined brown field on your map. That’s it. It’s a little bonus that adds very little to actual gameplay.

That pretty much sums up Puzzle City – it’s Puzzle Express “improved.” In improving, it also bumps up the system requirements. On my medium range PC, it lags a little on medium quality, and high quality slows to a crawl. It does look great on high-quality, so if you can play it on high, do so. The music is canned elevator jazz style, but it’s really not all that bad. The “click” sound got on my nerves after a while, but the sound of the game from the bulldozer and the buildings going up are very snappy indeed.

If you liked Puzzle Express, you’d enjoy Puzzle City. Don’t expect any more than a great Puzzle Express, and you’d have quite a lot of fun. It does get very difficult and frustrating in later levels, but thankfully there is an option to play it on easy. Puzzle City saves after every level, and it’ll last quite a while, even if you’re good at this sort of thing.

Advertisements